Theme Layout

[Rightsidebar]

Boxed or Wide or Framed

[Boxed]

Theme Translation

Display Featured Slider

Featured Slider Styles

[Center]

Display Grid Slider

No

Grid Slider Styles

[style2]

Display Trending Posts

Display Author Bio

No

Display Instagram Footer

So much of what you are, is where you have been.


Tuesday my students arrived to Florence not so bright eyed and bushy tailed, but excited none the less. I love having a new group of students every summer, they remind me of all of the cultural differences I have either forgotten or become accustomed to. I get to see Italy through a fresh pair of eyes every year!


After a full day of orientation (covering the dos and don'ts of living abroad for the first time), yesterday, Thursday, was our first official day in Florence.

The first place I like to take students is the Mercato Centrale. Not only do I love to see their reactions to cow testicles, stomachs, and brains, but it is an incredible lesson in the cultural importance of food. Americans have a very strange relationship with food. Our meat never looks like the animal it comes from and our fruits and veggies are harvested early to be shipped across the country (and even hemisphere). Food in Italy, however, is (for the most part) grown and sold locally. And meat and fish are butchered fresh daily in the market.


After grossing students out, I like to remind them that for centuries Italian peasants didn't have the luxury of just eating the breast of a chicken, every part of the animal was consumed and nothing was wasted. Although most students are not game at first, by the end of the trip we get many of them to at least try some of Tuscany's specialties - Trippa and Lampredotto (the first and fourth stomach of the cow) and Fegato (puréed chicken livers).

Following our morning market tour, the students split off into their various classes and I escaped to one of my favorite places in Florence, the Palazzo Pitti (and adjoining Boboli gardens).


Kirsten, my TA, and I enjoyed a fun afternoon in the gallery gazing at Raphael portraits and selecting our favorite fashions at the "history of the hat" show (I always "preview" museums before taking students, just to make sure things aren't closed or rearranged, which they often are!). Afterwards we strolled through the famous gardens snapping pics and soaking in the sunshine. All in all, I would say it was a pretty great day!

Today is another one of my other favorite days with students - the first time they see Michelangelo's David. David never disappoints! Hopefully I can sneak an illegal pic on Instagram!

Arrivederci!


QuickEdit
Ashley B
5 Comments
Share :

5 comments:

  1. How do your students choose to come to you? Is it through their university or some other way? I am enjoying your blog as always. Your perspective is wonderful. Rebecca

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a university program (it's actually a consortium of universities) that runs a semester in Florence. Technically anyone can go and the credits are awarded by one university and transferred to others. And thanks, glad you enjoy it!

      Delete
  2. How exciting! Looks like a good start to a great summer!

    Hunter
    Prep on a Budget

    ReplyDelete
  3. Glad your students finally arrived. Your pictures are beautiful!
    -Alex
    www.monstermisa.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. "So much of what you are is where you have been"--or haven't been, and you are right. I've noticed that my students who have done some international-traveling are less fearful in general and more self-confident than those of my students who haven't been far from their hometowns.

    I'm glad there's a growing movement in the U.S. of people supporting locally raised meats and produce, as well as eating tip-to-tail. These people are definitely not in the majority...yet. I've long believed that heart and tongue are the best part of the cow, and I'm usually loathe to share that tidbit of information, because at $1 per pound and only one tongue and one heart per cow, if everyone knew how delicious they are the demand and the price would go up! Also, as you point out, it's much easier to find tongue, heart, and pig-brains on restaurant menus outside the U.S...so sad...

    ReplyDelete

[name=Ashley] [img=https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-bTA6uO0YNf0/WEooiL2h2DI/AAAAAAAA-4A/4lNwqyMNFRAW7yUynRd5IRlAJVdXzWkrgCLcB/s1600/Blog_Pic_2.jpg] [description=Thanks for stopping by! Please feel free to leave a comment, I would love to hear from you.] (facebook=https://www.facebook.com/historyinhighheels/) (instagram=Ihttps://www.instagram.com/historyinhighheels/) (pinterest=https://www.pinterest.com/HistoryinHH/)